Archive for News Worthy

Driving lesson goes awry and SUV ends up at the bottom of a swimming pool

Driving lesson goes awry and SUV ends up at the bottom of a swimming pool (Love the photo.)
…excerpt from: http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2004/Jun/29/ln/ln22a.html

Boo-yah! I’m going to keep

Boo-yah! I’m going to keep nagging Jason until he applies this weekend’s test code site-wide. No legacy tags, beyotch! Oh, and… “This Page Is Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional!” I’m not sure if I wanna play with a fixed-width or stick with the variable. Doesn’t look great on anything less than 1024×768, but those folks are in the minority. Hey, I got it to look fantastic in all the major browsers on all the major platforms – that’s gotta count for something. Props to glish for the guidance. So, what did I use for my editor? Notepad, baby. Metapad, actually (the best clone around). Thanks to everyone else for the virtual ass-kicking; you accelerated the inevitable.
…excerpt from: http://chris.pirillo.com/archives/2004_03.html#009547

100 Most Often Mispronounced Words and Phrases in English

100 Most Often Mispronounced Words and Phrases in English (Some of these are surprising (not “suprising”).)
…excerpt from: http://www.yourdictionary.com/library/mispron.html

Internet Making World More Honest?

Interesting essay by Clive Thompson in NY Times Magazine arguing that the Internet generally makes people more honest: a Cornell…
…excerpt from: http://blogcritics.org/archives/2004/03/21/145505.php

Water-electrolysis toy cars

A Japanese toy-company is shipping a water-powered, 19cm-long car that “uses hydrogen created from the electrolysis of pure water” to run itself.Link (via Engadget)

…excerpt from: http://www.boingboing.net/2004/03/14/waterelectrolysis_to.html

Obesity, inactivity overtaking tobacco as top USA death cause

This online data chart released today by the Center for Disease Control shows that lack of physical activity and poor nutrition are catching up to smoking as a top cause of death in the United States. There’s an analysis in this week’s Journal of the American Medical Association (link), and a summary here from AP.
…excerpt from: http://boingboing.net/2004_03_01_archive.html#1078871388117048

The Macintosh at 20: Interview with Jef Raskin

Nice interview with Jef Raskin, creator of the Macintosh project at Apple and bOING bOING contributor.

very confused as to its use and when I was designing the software for the Macintosh, in designing the interface, I figured that if there was only one button, there would never be any question on what you have to press the number of ways of using a one-button mouse. I think this was probably a mistake, in fact there is an appendix in my book which discusses why I think this was a mistake and what I think I should have done. One of the reasons I made the mistake is that there is a certain school of industrial design dating back to the Bauhaus which says that designs have to be simple, uncluttered, and clean. In particular, don’t put writing on it except for brand names or logos. If we had had a multiple-button mouse with two keys, labeled something like “select” and “activate,” it would have been much easier to use, but the idea of putting writing on keys did not occur to anybody, including me. So if I was designing one today, it would have two buttons and they would be labeled. The labeling also the other good effect of forcing software designers to use them as labels otherwise it’s clear that they are being misused.

Link
…excerpt from: http://boingboing.net/2004_03_01_archive.html#107886930266706926